SHADE LOVING EDIBLE PLANTS : SHADE LOVING


Shade loving edible plants : Discount levelor blinds.



Shade Loving Edible Plants





shade loving edible plants






    loving
  • Feeling or showing love or great care

  • feeling or showing love and affection; "loving parents"; "loving glances"

  • (lovingness) affectionateness: a quality proceeding from feelings of affection or love

  • (lovingly) fondly: with fondness; with love; "she spoke to her children fondly"





    edible
  • (edibleness) edibility: the property of being fit to eat

  • Fit to be eaten (often used to contrast with unpalatable or poisonous examples)

  • comestible: any substance that can be used as food

  • suitable for use as food





    plants
  • Place (a seed, bulb, or plant) in the ground so that it can grow

  • Bury (someone)

  • Place a seed, bulb, or plant in (a place) to grow

  • (plant) put or set (seeds, seedlings, or plants) into the ground; "Let's plant flowers in the garden"

  • (plant) implant: fix or set securely or deeply; "He planted a knee in the back of his opponent"; "The dentist implanted a tooth in the gum"

  • (plant) buildings for carrying on industrial labor; "they built a large plant to manufacture automobiles"





    shade
  • relative darkness caused by light rays being intercepted by an opaque body; "it is much cooler in the shade"; "there's too much shadiness to take good photographs"

  • represent the effect of shade or shadow on

  • shadow: cast a shadow over

  • Screen from direct light

  • Darken or color (an illustration or diagram) with parallel pencil lines or a block of color

  • Cover, moderate, or exclude the light of











shade loving edible plants - Loving, Living,




Loving, Living, Party Going: WITH Loving AND Party Going (Vintage Classics)


Loving, Living, Party Going: WITH Loving AND Party Going (Vintage Classics)



WITH AN INTRODUCTION BY SEBASTIAN FAULKSHenry Green, whom W. H. Auden called 'the finest living English novelist', is the most neglected writer of the last century and the one most deserving of rediscovery by a new generation. This volume brings together three of Henry Green's intensely original novels. Green explored class distinctions through the medium of love. Loving brilliantly contrasts the lives of servants and masters in an Irish castle during World War Two, Living of workers and owners in a Birmingham iron foundry. Party Going is a brilliant comedy of manners, presenting a party of wealthy travellers stranded by fog in a London railway hotel while throngs of workers await trains in the station below.

WITH AN INTRODUCTION BY SEBASTIAN FAULKSHenry Green, whom W. H. Auden called 'the finest living English novelist', is the most neglected writer of the last century and the one most deserving of rediscovery by a new generation. This volume brings together three of Henry Green's intensely original novels. Green explored class distinctions through the medium of love. Loving brilliantly contrasts the lives of servants and masters in an Irish castle during World War Two, Living of workers and owners in a Birmingham iron foundry. Party Going is a brilliant comedy of manners, presenting a party of wealthy travellers stranded by fog in a London railway hotel while throngs of workers await trains in the station below.










85% (7)





Newly hatched extremely rare Atala nectaring on Moujean Tea flowers




Newly hatched extremely rare Atala nectaring on Moujean Tea flowers





Look at the proboscis, the straw-like projection this Atala has extended into the flower to sip its nectar. This is a tiny baby, newly hatched and just fueling up. There is another cocoon nearby and one that has been recently vacated... perhaps by this beauty. I love the iridescent blue highlights around the eyes, on the body and wings.

The Atala butterfly is strange to photograph. The colored areas are vague at the margins so the color looks like it has been dusted on a bit carelessly. But look at its marvelous tones... deep velvety blue, bright iridescent sky blue and brilliant red orange! It is very fast moving so getting a shot at all is always a thrill! Usually looks like a vibrant patch of astounding flying color and it's gone.

Interdependencies in nature once again. This marvelous creature owes its life to the Florida Coontie which was almost wiped out after being the money crop of the first Florida pioneers. Without the Coontie, this beauty will be gone.

The short, woody stem and rootstock of the Coontie grows almost completely underground and produces a terminal crown of stiff, evergreen, pinnate leaves up to 3 feet long. The brown, fleshy, erect, female or seed-bearing cones are pendent when mature. Coontie plants contain a natural toxin, which Atala larvae accumulate in their bodies and use to repel birds. Without Coontie, adult Atalas have no place to lay eggs. No eggs means no new generations. .

Wild Coonties’ demise began with starch: Long before Europeans arrived in Florida, Native Americans used Coontie as a source of starch. Coontie, in fact, is a Seminole word that means “bread” or “white root” because the roots can be made into flour.

From "The Forgotten Frontier: Florida Through the Lens of Ralph Middleton Munroe" by Arva Moore Parks: 'Behind the hammock land the pine and palmetto country seemed to go on forever. Sending roots into the crevices of stone, the tall pine and its companions, the bushy palmetto and the fernlike comptie (Zamia), thrived in what seemed like solid rock. Althought not as glamorous as the hammock, the pineland was the backbone of the land. The heart of the pine became the foundation of the pioneer home; the palmetto, for thatch, became the roof; and the starch made from the root of the comptie filled the pionerer's stomach."

Cootie is sporadic in pinelands and hammocks throughout nearly all peninsular Florida and the Keys. In an effort to preserve the Atala, the Coontie is being used increasingly in landscaping. Here in Miami, it is growing at Arch Creek East Environmental Preserve.

Arch Creek was an early Tequesta Indian settlement here in North Miami. Arch Creek is spanned by a natural limestone bridge. Early photographs of Miami show the bridge in all its beauty. Compromised now by encroaching housing and roadways.

The Tequesta Indians thrived in Arch Creek and the surrounding area. There was an oak hammock near the creek which provided shade as well as edible plants, nuts and berries. Biscayne Bay, less than a half mile away, was a prime food source for the Tequestas. There they caught shellfish, shark, manatee and turtle. North of the hammock were pine flatlands, which sheltered the all-important Coontie plant (Zamia integrifolia), whose roots the Indians ground to make an edible starch product.

Tequesta habitation sites characteristically have midden areas or Indian garbage dumps. The gradual decomposition of refuse, including plant material and animal bones, produces a rich black soil. Many artifacts have been preserved in the soil, and archaeologists have uncovered many of them, such as bone points, shell tools and pottery shards. During their centuries of occupation (from c. 400 A.D. to c. 1200 A.D.), the Arch Creek Tequestas had what appears to be a fairly comfortable lifestyle, supported by the abundant natural resources at the site.

Around 1858 two ambitious pioneers used the creek and its natural bridge as a site for a Coontie starch mill. These early entrepreneurs learned how to clean the poisonous roots and dammed up the waterway under the bridge diverting the flow through a sluice they carved out of a solid limestone bank. The water turned a wooden wheel attached to a nail-studded grinder, which mashed the cootie roots into a paste-like pulp. The resulting starch was then soaked and strained to remove any remaining poison. Laid out in wooden racks, the starch dried quickly and the sun bleached it white. In the early 1900s, several commercial factories in South Florida processed Coontie roots for the manufacture of arrowroot biscuits. But Coontie starch was not as successful as the pioneers thought, and the mill was abandoned several years later. The water sluice was filled in and paved over and was not rediscovered until archaeologists excavated it in 1972.

Atala Eumaeus
Moujean Tea, Nashia inaquensis
Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden, Miami, FL












Love-in-a-Mist (Nigella damascena)




Love-in-a-Mist (Nigella damascena)





Love-in-a-Mist (Nigella damascena)
Love in a Mist, Nigella damascena, is a charming Victorian garden annual. I love the blooms that are in watercolor shades of blue, white, rose, red and violet. The first time I saw it was when my mother grew it in her garden for drying. The blooms are pretty, plus the seedpods are very interesting as well. They are shaped a little like a dainty balloon and can be dried for crafting. I used them on woodland wreaths and straw hats I decorated for gifts. The flowers can be used as cut flowers, or pressed for crafting.
The plants are ferny looking-similar to fennel- which is why it's been called fennel flower as well as love-in-a-mist. They will grow to about 2 foot tall. The seeds can be sown outside as soon as the soil can be worked. Plant in fertile, well-drained soil where they will receives at least 6 hours of sun. The flowers bloom about three months after they are planted. Thin to 8-10 inches between plants. It will reseed the next year. Seed where you want the plants to stay because they don't transplant easily.

A note on another nigella, n. sativa, which is used as an herb-the seeds are spicy and can be used in cooking. It's often confused with n. damascena, which also has the edible seeds but is really not used for this purpose as far as I can tell. They have been used medicinally in some cultures, but n. sativa is the plant used as "black cumin" if you are interested in this.

Nigella damascena was popular in 16th Century gardens. It's an old fashioned garden annual that is very easy to grow and a charming addition to any garden! Try planting them with strawflowers, bachelor buttons, bell's of Ireland and globe amaranth for a wonderful everlasting garden.










shade loving edible plants








shade loving edible plants




The Art of Loving






The fiftieth Anniversary Edition of the groundbreaking international bestseller that has shown millions of readers how to achieve rich, productive lives by developing their hidden capacities for love
Most people are unable to love on the only level that truly matters: love that is compounded of maturity, self-knowledge, and courage. As with every art, love demands practice and concentration, as well as genuine insight and understanding.
In his classic work, The Art of Loving, renowned psychoanalyst and social philosopher Erich Fromm explores love in all its aspects—not only romantic love, steeped in false conceptions and lofty expectations, but also brotherly love, erotic love, self-love, the love of God, and the love of parents for their children.










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